Environmentally Friendly Chanterelle Pie

Environmentally Friendly Chanterelle Pie

Food consumption locally/worldwide has one of the single largest impacts on our environment. Not only do we throw away and waste a large proportion of all produced food. In Finland alone, food waste is a huge problem since at least 23 kg of food products are being thrown away per person each year. While in parts of the world population is still suffering from malnutrition and lack of food, more and more people suffer from overweight or are even obese.
There is no lack of food in our world, since today food is produced for at least 10 billion people worldwide, much of which is being thrown away and wasted. The largest problem is how our food is being produced and transported + the harsh reality of an immense amount of food waste.
An environmentally healthy diet is also good for your personal health. Learn more about environmentally healthy eating habits, and local food production/consumption.
Eatable mushrooms, including chanterelles, are a healthy option in many ways. Chanterelles, for instance, contain many healthy nutrients including vitamin D, iron, and non-animal proteins.
Here is a recipe I personally use to bake a chanterelle pie (I hunt my chanterelles personally from local forests where I live!).
Chanterelle pie (8 portions)
 
Crust:
 
125 g quark
125 g butter/margarine
3 1/2 dl flour
1/4 teaspoons of salt
1 teaspoon sodium bicarbonate (baking powder)
 
Filling:
 
1 litre of chanterelles
1 large onion (or, leek/spring onion)
1 tomato
1 fresh chili
One small package of cream cheese (not necessary, if you want less calories)
a pinch of salt
a pinch of black pepper
2 dl cream
1 egg
grated cheese
 
Preparation:
 
1. Mix the crust ingredients to an even dough. Then roll the crust onto a pie tin (a diameter of 26 cm is optimal for this crust size)
 
2. Fry the chanterelles on a medium temperature until most of the moisture evaporates. Add the onion, tomato, chili and continue frying until these take on a bit of color. Add (voluntarily) the cream cheese and fry until the cream cheese has melted. Remember to stir in-between.
 
3. Mix the egg and some grated cheese in a separate bowl. Add some black pepper. Stir.
 
4. Pour the pan ingredients (chanterelles, tomato, chili, onion, cream cheese) on top of the crust.
 
5. Pour the egg/grated cheese mix on top of the pie. Add some extra grated cheese if you want to.
 
6. Bake in 220 degrees Celsius in the oven for about 30 minutes.
 
7. Take the pie from the oven and serve.
 
Ps. For vegans/gluten intolerants; please adjust according to your special needs. Also adjust to your special needs if you are allergic to some ingredient.
 
Bon appetit!
 
 
 
Plant a Tree

Why Should You Plant a Tree?

Stop deforestation.

Invest into reforestation.

When forests are being cut down, the living environment of all forest animals and plants is being destroyed, leaving less and less space for these to live, to survive, and to thrive within. Forests play a significant role in our planet’s healthy ecosystem.

Mahatma Gandhi knew what he was talking about when he said

“What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mere reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another.”

#deforestation #reforestation #savetherainforests #saveallforests #ecosystem#carbonsink #ghgsink #climatechange #environmentaldestruction #pollution#climatecrisis

Why Should You Have to Protect The Environment

Why Should You Have to Protect The Environment?

Repeat after me:

I do not want to protect the environment. I want us to create a world where the environment needs no protection. Anne-Maria Yritys

Why should you even have to protect the environment? Would it not be much easier to create a world where the environment needs no protection?

How can this be achieved in a world where man leaves a heavy footprint wherever he goes?

In brief: to create an economically more sustainable future for ourselves and for future generations, we must focus upon developing following sectors:

  1. Transition away from polluting and environmentally damaging fossil fuels and sources of energy that involve serious risks for both the environment and overall health => renewable energy sources such as geothermal energy, hydropower, ocean energy, solar energy and wind energy. The global energy sector is the main reason for human-caused climate change and global warming.
  2. Development of cleantech, including the previously mentioned energy sector.
  3. Circular economies, including recycling and drastic reduction of produced waste.
  4. Sustainable agriculture, farming, and fishing practices.
  5. Education => slowing down population growth.
  6. Legislation and taxation that supports sustainable economic development.

Contact me directly for further discussion.

Anne-Maria Yritys May 29th 2019.

 

 

Why We Are Not Taking Climate Action Fast Enough

During my studies/research on climate and environmental topics from a wide variety of angles since several years back, I have noticed how much progress has been made around the world in terms of environmental protection, and concrete climate action.

With climate change deniers, resistants, apathetic individuals and those who talk the talk without actually walking their talk, our world has plenty of individuals who actually are fully dedicated in their everyday lives to tackling both climate change and environmental destruction. These individuals take action in their personal lives, create businesses and contribute to/make significant political decisions in terms of protecting our local/global environment without which things could look much worse than they actually are today.

In terms of communicating climate and environment-related topics local and global journalism/media play a significant role; how else would the crowd be informed about any development that is taking place? Well-informed citizens of any country, or people who dig deep into specific topics out of personal or business interest of course know how to search for information through a wide variety of sources, which today is even more simple than ever thanks to the Internet and people around the world having public access to information and reports, many times for free.

Nevertheless, and despite important political decisions and legislative changes in terms of environmental protection, journalism and media have a huge responsibility and lots of power when it comes to bringing public awareness about specific issues, climate change and environmental protection. Anthropogenic climate change and environmental protection are both no new topics.

Those with longer life experience and more years behind them know that specific climate/environmental issues have been discussed for several decades. In recent years, however, there has been a significant increase in climate change and environmental topics brought up by various media outlets. Since the Paris Agreement was signed on April 22nd 2016, most countries on our planet have actually pledged to concrete climate action; some countries with more ambition than others.

The main goal of the Paris Agreement is for all countries that have signed (and ratified) the agreement to take concrete actions in order to stop global warming and to prevent global average temperatures from rising above 1,5 degrees Celsius (34,7 Fahrenheit), since research indicates that even slight increases in global (or regional) average temperatures can and will lead to drastic changes worldwide in terms of for instance food security. The purpose of the Paris Agreement is also to ensure that countries take all possible action to reduce GHG ́s (greenhouse gas emissions), which are found to be increasing the global average temperatures through the warming effect that these create.

The question is, however: Do We Take Climate Action Fast Enough?

In the global energy sector, renewable energy sources (excluding nuclear energy), today account for 25,6 % of the total global energy sector, a vast majority of which comes from hydropower (15,9 %). (IHA 2019). Despite the growing capacity of renewable energy sources worldwide in recent years, energy-heavy sectors such as cooling, heating and transport lag behind and renewable energy sources such as solar and wind today account for 2,1 % respectively 4,6 % of total global energy. (IHA 2019; REN21 2018).

Climate marches and school strikes on behalf of climate action and environmental protection that gather millions of people together around the world of course bring an important message and put increasingly much pressure on both educational institutions and schools, businesses in all industries, and governments/politicians, but the focal point here is to focus upon concrete action, which can be taken on various levels throughout societies: in our personal lives, in businesses, and in terms of legislation.

It is comforting to notice that despite of certain climate change resistance or complete ignorance even among world leaders, major cities around the world and in countries such as the U.S. are committed to taking action and concrete measures to either eliminate or reduce their carbon emissions, including for instance New York, Los Angeles and Chicago. Furthermore, research and reports published by IRENA and OPEC reveal how even traditional oil-drilling/oil-producing regions invest into renewable energy sources such as solar and wind.

Nevertheless, with a rapid population growth globally and a continuous increase in energy consumption worldwide, environmentally more sustainable solutions are much needed to keep up with the current development in order to meet the demands of the Paris Agreement which aims not only to protect, but in fact to save our planet Earth from complete destruction.

Anne-Maria Yritys 13.5.2019

 

Abu Dhabi desert

The Future Belongs to Those Who Create it

With a rapidly growing world population and an extensive exploitation of Mother Earth ́s natural resources it is not to wonder that we are facing a global environmental crisis.

 

What else is to be expected when (rain) forests are being cut down at the current rate? Much of our world’s land area being turned into buildings, skyscrapers or poorly managed farming land.

 

In less than one century, man has managed to destroy most of this planet in what may deceive many human eyes by its architectural extravagance, or go unseen by most of humanity by the amount of garbage and poisons thrown vastly into the environment, including our oceans, around the world.

 

For the future belongs to those who create it; so humanity can only blame itself for the upcoming environmental disaster and catastrophe.

 

Those who created this contemporary industrialized world where our global environment is the currency, are old enough not to have to personally face or live the destruction of our planet.

 

Younger generations, and human children yet unborn, are those who will have to deal with the consequences of all the evil that mankind has done to our planet within the past 100 years alone.

 

The only way to really make a difference is to change from within; to change your personal behavior and consumption habits.

 

When you change yourself, society must follow. Businesses must follow. Legislation must follow. There is no other way than radical change among all of humanity. Otherwise, we will all soon be lost.

 

“Wherever you go, you will always leave a footprint”.

 

Do you know how your personal/business lifestyle affects the environment?

 

If not, find out by using a carbon footprint calculator. You can find one with an Internet search, for instance at WWF (World Wildlife Fund).

 

Moreover, you can calculate your personal/business fresh water consumption. Check out for instance The Friends of The Earth (water footprint calculator).

 

Anne-Maria Yritys 7.5.2019

 

Old aluminium can

Why is Recycling Important?

Finding museum waste in the forest devastates me. This aluminium can is from a time period when Finland was not yet a member of EMU and did not have the Euro € as a currency, but the Finnish mark.

Finland has been a euro country since 1.1.2002 so this aluminium can has most probably been in the forest for more than 17 years now. I found it in a local forest today.

With a recycling fee on aluminium cans + glass and plastic bottles, it should not be such a hard task to actually recycle. Or, throw waste into a waste bin instead of dumping it in nature.

Aluminium, other metals, glass or plastic is NOT biodegradable materials.

The level of stupidity among human beings does not cease to amaze me.

#recycling #dontthrowyourwasteintonature #environmentaldamage #wastemanagement

 

Why Do We Need a Green Finland?

According to polls, more than 30% of youth in Finland want to vote green. It, along with the continuous climate strikes among students in Finland, speaks for how concerned children and youth are about the state of the environment. We live in important times.

 

Finland’s parliamentary elections take place on April 14th, followed by European Parliament elections in May, and Finland’s Presidency of the European Council starting on July 1st.

 

Finland aims to act as a role model for the rest of the world in terms of taking action upon anthropogenic climate change and in meeting the targets of the 2015 signed Paris Agreement.

 

Cities are cooperating to find ways of becoming increasingly much sustainable, and Nordic countries have agreed upon increased cooperation to tackle climate change, its consequences and what needs to be done.

 

Contrary to certain attitudes and beliefs according to which it is pointless for sparsely populated countries like Finland to do anything in terms of climate change or in terms of taking climate action, it is a fact that developed, high-tech, welfare countries such as Finland do play a significant role in terms of environmental well-being.

 

Although e.g. China and India are among the most populous countries on our planet, western societies and developed countries contribute more together than most developing countries, with for instance production being outsourced to low-cost developing countries such as India, China, Turkey, Vietnam, and Cambodia.

 

Anne-Maria Yritys 6.4.2019

 

Environmentally friendly vegetable soup

Environmentally Friendly Vegetable Soup

Try out this environmentally friendly, self-made, healthy vegetable soup: 
 
Ingredients:
Sweet potato, carrots, parsnip, onion, garlic, chili, broccoli, dried yellow feet, fresh thyme, fresh ginger. 
 
Preparation:
1. Peel the vegetables (or, use them whole; without peeling).
 
2. Sauté the onion + add the rest of the vegetables/ingredients.
 
3. Add vegan/vegetarian Fond du Chef and one litre of water.
 
4. Cook on a low temperature for about 15 minutes.
5. Mash with a stick blender.
 
6. Serve hot or cold, with fresh thyme (or some other fresh herb).
 
Bon appetit!
Photos & recipe: Anne-Maria Yritys

Fresh vegetables
Fresh vegetables
Preparation of vegetable soup
Preparation of vegetable sou

Self-made vegetable soup
Self-made vegetable soup